Dictionary of Cork Slang

'Irish by misfortune. Cork by the grace of God.'
 
All over the shop
Everywhere (as in “I was walking down Pana and there was old dolls all over the shop” = I was walking down St Patrick’s Street and there girls everywhere).  Or,  all over the place (as in “I seen your man langers and he was all over the shop” =  I saw that man drunk and he was swaying from side to side.
 
All-a-bah
Up for grabs.  Usually said by children throwing objects up into the air and whoever catches them can keep them.
 
Allergic
An expression of dislike.  “I’m allergic to that feller.”
 
Alleys
Glass marbles
 
Ass
The dregs of a drink. “I’m up the ass of your can of beer” =  may I have the remainder of your beverage.
 
Away for slates
Do well,  be successful. “After the goal,  Cork were away for slates.”
 
Badinas
Bathing costumes
 
Ball hopper
Mischievous joker
 
Backer
The carrier above the back wheel of a bicycle  To give somebody a backer is to give them a lift on this carrier.  Carry them on the crossbar and it’s a “crosser.”
 
Ball on
Keep going.  “Ball on until you see Shandon.”
 
Balmed out
Very relaxed (usually following the smoking of a dounchy nodge,  or a small piece of cannabis.)
 
Baloobas
Insanely drunk people with no regard for authority.
 
Bangers
A game of football involving kicking the ball in turn against a wall.  Very annoying if you live in the house that it’s being played against.
 
Banjaxed
Broken beyond repair.  “This stepladder is banjaxed.”
 
Bar-of-gold
The most favoured child in a family.  “Little Seamus is Mary’s bar-of-gold.”
 
Bazzer
A haircut
 
Beat that in two throws!
Term of approval after something remarkable has been achieved.
 
Black-as / Blackberries / Blood-and-bandages
The red jerseys and white shorts of the Cork hurling and football teams.  Also the teams themselves:  “Come on,  you blood-and-bandages.”
 
Bodice
Pork spare ribs,  a very popular Cork dish.
 
Break your melt
Test your patience to the breaking point.  “That feller would break your melt!”
 
Breezer
Fart
 
Búdán
Erection.  “I woke up this morning with a big búdán up on me.”
 
Bulb
Two people who look alike.  “Denis is the bulb off his father.”
 
Cawhake
Preventing something from taking place.  “They withdrew the funding from the flood barrier and that put the cawhake on it.”  Similar to Cockney “putting the mockers on it.”
 
Chainies
Pieces of broken china that little girls would use to play tea-sets.
 
C’mere
A way of catching somebody’s attention.  “C’mere lamp the gatch on that feen” = look at the way that young man is walking.
 
Chalk it down
Yes,  absolutely right. As in,  “Are you going to the match Friday?”  “Chalk it down,  boy.”
 
Cheeser
A vicious blow usually inflicted by a teacher with a steel ruler.
 
Chicken chaser
Noisy moped
 
Claim
To challenge somebody to a fight which you are pretty sure you can win.  “Come on,  you langer and I claim ya.”
 
Climpy
Easy.  “We got a load of ecca but it was pure climpy” = we had a lot of homework but it was very easy.  Also, dimwit.  “That feen’s some climpy.”
 
Cabbage
The change you keep when your mother sends you to the shop,  or the cash you keep out of sight of the old doll.
 
Choicer
Choice, or “nothing.”  “He hardly did it for choicer”  =  he didn’t do it out of the goodness of his heart.
 
Cod
To joke or fool someone.  “Are you codding me?”
 
Cog
To copy somebody’s homework and pass it off as your own.  “I cogged that exam.”
 
Compo
Compensation claimed for “falling” or “tripping” on public roads and around public amenities.  A common method of generating income in Cork.
 
Confubbled
Confused
 
Da Berries
Fantastic;  nice,  “That new dress is da berries on you.”
 
Daw
Stupid person
 
Dawk
A punch,  or a dig in the ribs to shut somebody up. 
 
Daycent
Good.  “That’s some daycent record,  boy.”
 
Da Flicks
The cinema.  “I’m bring me old doll to da flicks for a shift” = I’m taking my girlfriend to the cinema for a kiss.
 
Debt
Injury (possibly caused as an act of revenge.)  “Sean got an awful debt off his bike” = he experienced terrible pain when his big toe was severed by the spokes.
 
Doggy wide
Be extra vigilant,  or on the lookout.  “Be doggy wide I seen a two bulb around” = watch out I’ve seen a police car in the area.
 
Donkeys gudge
Chester cake (a thick brown paste containing sultanas and bakery leftovers between two slices of pastry,  also known as “gur cake”  because it was a favourite with “gurriers” or truants because it was cheap and that was all they could afford.
 
Dounchy
Very small (smaller than “twinchy.”)  Can either refer to a small piece of chocolate or cannabis or a person.  “Look at the size of your man,  he’s dounchy.”
 
Down the banks
A reprimand.  “I gave him down the banks.”
 
Dowcha boy!
A term of approval or acclaim,  such as when a goal is scored.
 
Draw
Cannabis
 
Drisheen
Sheep’s or cow’s blood pudding usually eaten with tripe.
 
Drizzle
A drink,  usually cadged.  “Give us a drizzle off your can,  willya boy.”
 
Farting jacket
A tight-fitting coat
 
Feen
Man or boy.  “That feen is dead on” = that boy is likeable.
 
FG
Free Gaff = party location,  not to be confused with the political party Fine Gael.  “Was that the FG when O’Leary took a hopper onto the bona?” =  was that the party when O’Leary jumped in to the bonfire?
 
Fifty-fiftied
Stood up for a date.  In other words,  only 50 percent of the couple showed up.
 
Flah
Sexual relations.  “I flahed your wan.” = I had sex with that girl.
 
Flahed out
Totally exhausted.  Not very polite.  English equivalent = shagged out.
 
Flange
The female genitalia.  The lowered crossbar on a female bicycle is known as a flange bar.
 
Fridgid
Any girl who refuses to have sexual relations.
 
Funt
A kick
 
Gapped
Noticeably wide parting between a girl’s legs.  “Lamp the gatch on that wan she’s pure gapped!”
 
Garry
A go or a try.  “Give us a garry off your bike, boy.”
 
Gatch
Way of walking.  “Can I buy that gatch off of you,  boy?” = you have a strange way or unusual way of walking.
 
Gatt
Alcoholic drink.  Hence “gatting” for drinking,  usually with cans of cheap lager in Dunnes Stores car-park.
 
Gawk
To stare.  As in,  “Why is that feen gawking at me?”  Also,  to vomit,  “I was mouldy and i gawked all over the shop” = I was drunk and I vomited everywhere.
 
Getawaysticks
Legs – usually female,  and usually worth commenting on.
 
Gildy
Taking care of your appearance.
 
Going-on scrips
Instructions (for a flat-pack wardrobe, for instance)
 
Gom
A stupid operson
 
Grade
Money.  “Have you grade for gatts?”
 
Guzzle
Drink quickly.  “Guzzle that boy,  the shades are coming!”
 
Goosa
Gooseberry, as in being the third unwanted person on a date.
 
Goosed
Broken.  “Is that nock goosed,  sham?” = Is that object broken,  my good man?
 
Hauled in
Arrested.  “I was hauled in last night for gawking on some old doll for the laugh” = I was arrested for puking over a girl for the fun of it.
 
Haunted
Extremely lucky.  “I flahed your wan and I was haunted I didn’t catch anything off her.”
 
Here la
Look here.  “Here la,  two gatts.” = Look,  I’ve brought us two alcoholic drinks.
 
Hobble
To steal or shoplift
 
Hod
A walk.  “Let’s go for a hod.”
 
Hoop
The anus.  Strangely used in Youghal as a greeting. “Hey,  Hoop,  how’s she going?”
 
Hopper
A fall.  “I took some hopper off my bike.”  
 
Hoggy
Nickname for anybody named Horgan.
 
“I will in my gonkapouch.”
I certainly won’t.
 
“If you were sad,  she’d make you lonesome.”
Somebody whose conversation is both boring and depressing.
 
Jackeen
Dubliner – especially those who waved the Union Jack when British monarchs visited Dublin in the past.  Still held in some mild contempt in Cork – the Rebel County.
 
Jag
A date. “I’m going out on a jag with Maureen.”
 
Jagging
Going out with somebody, usually involving not much more than shifting.
 
Keep sketch
Act as a look-out.  “Keep sketch for the shades” = watch out for the police.
 
Leadránach
Boring.  “That film was very leadránach.
 
Lamp
To look or glance at something.  
 
Lang
To take a free ride (a “langie”) on the back of a vehicle such as a lorry or a bus.
 
Lang
On the lang,  or on the hop = playing truant from school.
 
Langball
A person less offensive than a langer,  but still unpleasant.
 
Langer
Penis.  Can be used as an insult in the same way as “prick” in English.  
 
Langerload
Large amount,  as in “He’s making a langerload of grade” = he’s making a lot of money.
 
Langers
Very drunk – “After eight lagers I was totally langers.”
 
Lapsy pa
Food poisoning or diarrhoea or any unknown sickness.
 
Lasher
Gorgeous girl
 
Law
Officers of An Garda Síochána,  or “guards”
 
Legger
To run away.  “I done a legger”
 
Loberty
Trouble,  especially financial.  “Your man is in the height of loberty.”
 
Logie
Lacking energy or sluggish
 
Long slogs
A game played between two youths in which a leather ball is struck to and fro with a hurley at very high velocity over a long distance,  preferably up and down a residential street with lots of parked cars in it.
 
Mad
Good, enjoyable. “Mad choons, boy!” = good music.
 
Make tracks
Leave.  “I’ve no spoondoolies left so I’m going to make tracks” = I have run out of money and so I’m leaving.
 
Manage
A savings scheme operated by a few people,  usually women.  “Don’t forget to give Brenda the money for the manage.”
 
Massive
Very good,  beautiful.  Can describe anything from a Christmas dinner to a dress
 
Me daza
Term of approval.  “That Tanora is me daza.”
 
Meb
Idiot (or testicle)
 
Mebs
Testicles,  or a balls-up.  “He made a pure mebs of that job.”
 
Mockeyah
Not real,  not the genuine article. 
 
Nobber
Promiscuous man
 
Noo-di-naw
Indecisive person
 
Old doll
Wife or girlfriend
 
Old man’s arse
Someone who acts old even if they’re still young
 
Out
To be offended with someone abnd/or refuse to speak to the,  “Denis out with Mick.”
 
Out the gap
To leave.  “Give us a smoke and then I’m out the gap.”
 
Pana
St Patrick’s Street,  Cork’s main shopping street
 
Panned out
Lying down,  especially if you’ve been knocked down flat in a fight
 
The Passover
Trinity Bridge over the south channel of the River Lee
 
Pooley
A child’s name for pee
 
Pure
Utterly,  completely.  “I left my sausage in the oven and it was pure burned,  like.”
 
Rake
A large quantity,  usually of alcohol.  “I had a rake of pints last night.”
 
Rasa
Raspberry cordial
 
Rocker
A very large stone but still moveable or throwable
 
Rubber dollies
Trainers or running shoes
 
Rushers
Wellington boots
 
Savage
Extremely.   Could be used to compliment a good-looking woman from a distance.  “Savage old doll by the bar there” or describe a seirous nose-bleed “My schribler is bleeding something savage.”
 
Scobe
Miser.  Somebody tight with money.
 
Sconce/have a sconce at
Look.  Take a look at.
 
Scove
A walk or a stroll
 
Scuttering gun
Water-pistol
 
Septic
Very vain.  “Look at your man, he thinks he’s it,  he’s septic.”
 
Seven shows of Cork
Severe verbal abuse or dressing-down.  “Mary was so angry she gave Kevin the seven shows of Cork.”
 
Shades
The police
 
Shaping
Showing off.   “Look at her,  she’s shaping.”
 
Shore
Roadside drain
 
Slocking
Stealing fruit from an orchard
 
Square pushing
Kissing and cuddling – usually the sort that invites spectators to shout out “find a room!”
 
Stailc
Childish tantrum or sulk.  “That boy is in a stailc.”
 
Steerinah
Home-made cart for children
 
Strawkalling
Passing the time not doing much
 
Throw a rabie
Get worked up and angry
 
Tanora
Orange-flavoured soft drink
 
Televated
Dressed up
 
Tocht
An emotional lump in the throat (pronounced “tuct”)
 
Two-bulb
Police vehicle
 
Ucks
The core of an apple.  “When you’re finished with that apple,  give us the ucks.”
 
Up the walls
Very busy
 
Wax a gaza
Clamp a lamp-post.  (Gaza = gas=lamp).  Usually used as a way of telling somebody to go away = “go and wax a gaza.”